Category Archives: Photography

Regarding the Pain of Trump

Regarding the Pain of Trump – Los Angeles Review of Books

by Rebecca Chace

A brilliant reflection on re-reading Susan Sontag’s Regarding the Pain of Others and the power and danger of images and need to be more than passive witnesses.

Images of suffering and atrocity now have unparalleled access to our most intimate spaces. Most of us keep that connection open in our pockets or in the palm of our hands….

We are vulnerable to images just as we are vulnerable to propaganda. Our visceral experience of violent and disturbing images has changed not only because of the unprecedented speed of their transmission but also because there is no longer any mediation between these images and the viewer. Media outlets used to edit what images were permissible to share with the public. Now, if we have access to the technology, we can share directly with each other in real time. There is true political power in the removal of the mediator, but as there is more to respond to, there is proportionally more emotional instability.

Read entire essay >

 

Cindy Sherman: ‘Why am I in these photos?’

Cindy Sherman: ‘Why am I in these photos?’| The Guardian

Photographer Cindy Sherman talks about a difficult childhood, her compulsion to dress up, growing older – and why she now prefers to live alone.

…”A flick through the photographs in her current retrospective exhibition in LA reveals her transformed into 20 kinds of matinee starlet, Hitchcock lead, pneumatic Monroe, terrified centrefold, crime-scene corpse, old master muse, cut-up sex doll, Republican wife, clown; both as determinedly absent and iconically present in her work as Andy Warhol once was in his.” [read entire article]

Cindy Sherman in front of her work at the Broad museum, Los Angeles, where a major retrospective of her work is taking place. Photograph: Dan Tuffs for the Observer

Frederick Douglass’s Faith in Photography

Frederick Douglass’s Faith in Photography
How the former slave and abolitionist became the most photographed man in America.
By Matthew Pratt Guterl, New Republic

“New, cheaper techniques of reproduction, Douglass believed, allowed for a truer, more precise impression of the person on display. They also made it possible for the subject of the photograph to determine, to some extent, how people read and understood the image. Frame by frame, the authors of the volume show how carefully Douglass tried—in an age where, for so many people of color, this was simply unimaginable—to control meaning.” [read complete article]

Fashion Photos with Outfits Made from Trash in Senegal

Fashion Photos with Outfits Made from Trash Found in Polluted Areas of Senegal

“The Prophesy” is a striking series of photographs by photographer Fabrice Monteiro that shines light on the problem of pollution in Africa, yet offers a message of hope. Each image is a “high fashion photo” in which the garment is crafted from things found at locations that have been altered by trash.

Partnering with costume designer Doulsy and the Ecofund Organization, Monteiro visited 10 different polluted sites in the country of Senegal. The team created haute couture outfits using bits of things found here and there, and then photographed the models in front of the polluted environment as a backdrop.

from Peta Pixel

Readings on Future of Photography

SOME GOOD READS

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In the future, there will be no such thing as a “straight photograph”

The Next Revolution in Photography Is Coming
TIME Lightbox
by Stephen Mayes

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The Case for Never Banning a Photograph By Jordan G. Teicher

What is 21st Century Photography by Daniel Rubinstein

Meet the Artists who play with the rules of Documentary Photography by 

The Best of Photojournalism – September 2014 – LightBox

The Best of Photojournalism – September 2014 -TIME LightBox

TIME Lightbox has amassed an interesting selection of recent photographs and fantastic group of recent articles looking at recent events in Ferguson, MO, Iraq, and Gaza, as well as  the Ebola outbreak and more – LINK

photo by Scott Olson