Category Archives: Artists

Nao Bustamante’s Soldaderas, Real and Imagined

New Project from one of my favorite artists Nao Bustamente – women, history, identity, revolution, subversion, re-enactement, and archival research!

Nao Bustamante’s “Soldadera” is a “speculative reenactment” of women’s participation in The Mexican Revolution. ­­
>> Article from KCET
>> Article in LA Times

Source: Nao Bustamante’s Soldaderas, Real and Imagined | Los Angeles | Artbound | KCET

LAURA POITRAS and HITO STEYERL [together]

A conversation between two brilliant minds,  LAURA POITRAS and  HITO STEYERL, in the pages of Art Forum May 2015
 A few excerpts:

LP: The limits of my imagination are much less interesting than what I encounter going into the field and filming. So yes, it obviously changed the narrative. But part of vérité filmmaking, and documenting in the present tense as things unfold, is going where the story leads. It’s uncertain and scary at times, but that is why there is drama.

HS: What kind of storytelling can adapt to the technological novelty and also to the vastness of the database as an archive?

….how does the editor work in the twenty-first century? Especially if, as in your case, the editor is also the person with the movie camera and the Soundbeam and the encrypted hard drive; she is a writer who designs a whole infrastructure of communication.

HS on Editing:
… And I think that editing, not only in filmmaking but in a lot of different activities, is a crucial activity. Postproduction is not working on content in retrospect but creating the content. Editing is where the meaning is created.

Godard said an edit could be an “and” or an “or.” That is how traditional film or video editing works. But now editing, with newer media and with physical reality becoming mediatized to a large extent, becomes a much more expanded activity, being able to channel and process information and to put together meaning in a much more expanded field.

Now instead of expanded cinema, it’s expanded editing, expanded postproduction, and circulation across different platforms and formats. I think it’s one of the crucial lenses through which to analyze contemporary activities.

LP: I think in the art world, duration is often seen as transgressive because it’s somehow forcing the audience to go beyond their comfort level, to subject them to an endurance test. And yet duration is absolutely accepted within mainstream cinema. So duration is perceived very differently in those two domains. Warhol, of course, was the supreme example of really pushing that in beautiful ways.

[read entire article]

“Hito Steyerl” is on view at Artists Space, New York, through May 24. “Laura Poitras” will be on view at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, Feb. 5–May 15, 2016.

Hito Steyerl, How Not to be Seen: A Fucking Didactic Educational .MOV File, 2013more links:
Hito Steryl in e-flux and more articles in Art ForumLaura Poitrais Praxis Films

Lyndsey Addario

It’s what I do – new memoir by Photojournalist Lynsey Addario

Article in New York Times Sunday Book Review

Excerpt in NY Times magazine: “What Can a Pregnant Photojournalist Cover? Everything.”

Article and video at TIME light Box

“I would never think of myself as a role model,” says Lynsey Addario. The 41-year-old, twice-kidnapped, mother-of-one, award-winning photojournalist has released, this month, her first book: an autobiography of her life as a Connecticut-born photographer who has spent the last 15 years witnessing the true human cost of war, particularly for women across the world. [read more of the TIME piece and watch video]

The hook for the TIME article is  “Meet the Photographer Who Found How to Balance a Life of Love and War ” –  Although this inspired from the tag line of her memoir (exact wording: “A Photographer’s Life of Love and War” – would the focus on ‘Balance’ ever been used to describe a male photojournalist? Lyndsey Addario has published many brilliant statements on the gender bias in war journalism. (see this post in The NY Times Lens Blog.) Many more entries about her on the Lens blog as well.

Another good interview can be found on the Word and Film website: One Woman’s Wars: A Q&A with Photojournalist Lynsey Addario.

Needless to say, I will be buying and reading the book.

 

Hank Willis Thomas on Black Male Identity

Re-blogging from photoandimaging.net

“What Is Common to All of Us?” Redefining Black Male Identity
by Hank Willis Thomas
Creative Time Reports.

Drawing from his collaborative transmedia project “Question Bridge: Black Males,” the artist Hank Willis Thomas examines the racial context of the 2012 killing of Jordan Davis as the man who shot the 17-year-old Florida resident, Michael Dunn, is retried for murder.

Screenshot from “Question Bridge: Black Males,” a collaborative transmedia project of Chris Johnson, Hank Willis Thomas, Bayeté Ross Smith and Kamal Sinclair.

Every person has a “day of infamy” in his or her life. For the parents of Jordan Davis, that day was November 23, 2012. For the parents of Trayvon Martin, it was February 26, 2012. For the parents of Michael Brown, it was August 9, 2014. For me, it was February 2, 2000—a Tuesday. That was the day I lost Songha Thomas Willis, my cousin, roommate, best friend and, for all intents and purposes, big brother. He was shot dead in front of dozens of people during a robbery in which he did not resist. [read more]

– – – – – – – – – – – – –
{Proud to say that Hank was a alumnus of Photography & Imaging and a student in my senior projects class.}

Garry Winogrand

The first major Garry Winogrand retrospective since 1988 is on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art until Sept. 21

Born in the Bronx, Winogrand did much of his best-known work in Manhattan during the 1950s and 1960s, and in both the content and dynamic style he became one of the principal voices of the eruptive postwar decades. Known primarily as a street photographer, Winogrand, who is often associated with famed contemporaries Diane Arbus and Lee Friedlander, photographed with dazzling energy and incessant appetite, exposing some 26,000 rolls of film in his short lifetime. He photographed business moguls, everyday women on the street, famous actors and athletes, hippies, politicians, soldiers, animals in zoos, rodeos, car culture, airports, and antiwar demonstrators and the construction workers who beat them bloody in view of the unmoved police. Daily life in America—rich with new possibilities and yet equally anxiety-ridden and threatening to spin out of control—seemed to unfold for him in a continuous stream.

READINGS

MICHAEL SCHMIDT

Michael Schmidt

On May 24, 3 days after he received the Prix Pictet, Michael Shmdit died.. The award this year  focused on consumption. [see NY TIMES article]. The Prix Pichetet site has a great post  about him.  A quote:
Michael Schmidt once called himself a ‘blind alley’ photographer, “… that means that I stroll straight into a cul-de-sac and can’t find a way out. Then I come to terms with this as a sort of condition and at some point later on, I’m back on the outside again. (…) That is to say, failure or making mistakes is an integral part of my way of working.”

MICHAEL SCHMIDT | AMERICAN SUBURB X. has several of his series posted. [bookmark American Suburb blog – excellent resource.]

obituary from the BBC

Bruce Connor: A Movie

Another posting of the video at Critical Commons

Today I came across this link to 20 banned or otherwise unavailable movies you can only watch online.  Many good movies (like The Karen Carpenter Story with Barbies) but most excited to find link to Bruces Conner’s A Movie. I can still remember seeing his films when I was grad student in Chicago and Bruce was a visiting artist. Pivotal moment for me seeing these film.
more info on Bruce Conner> J. Hoberman in VIllage Voice, Slant Magazine : The Art of Montage, Obituary in the Guardian  

Eva Respini (MoMA) and Mark Durant (St. Lucy) talking about Robert Heinecken

Great interview on the Saint Lucy blog with Eva Respini, curator of the MOMA exhibition on  Robert Heinecken

Launched in 2011 by Mark Alice Durant, Saint Lucy is devoted to writing about photography and contemporary art. He co-wrote  Robert Heinecken: A Material History in 2003.

They talk about much more than Robert Heinecken, but here is a taste of their thoughts on Heinecken:

MAD: Heinecken’s opposition to narrow definitions of what it meant to be a photographic artist manifested itself in many ways. One of them is this iterative process you talk about which I assume came from his training as a printmaker.  Looking at the show downstairs, one of the things that really strikes me, just how many layers we look through to the work.  There are frames within frames, there are palimpsest pieces, incisions, and interruptions in the supposed transparency of photography, which was embraced and canonized at MoMA and much of east coast photographers, critics and academics.

ER:  When I go through the show it still amazes me how unafraid he was in terms of using new technology, new materials, new processes and as you say, layering them on top of one another.  Anytime something came out, some new material or camera, Heinecken was experimenting with it immediately in such an uninhibited way. [ read entire interview ]

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Chris Marker ‘s influence

For all of us Chris Marker fans – great article in the Guardian

‘Thrilling and prophetic’: why film-maker Chris Marker’s radical images influenced so many artists  The Guardian.

Chris Marker was a phantom, an escape artist, a shapeshifter. He told friends he came from Ulan Bator, Mongolia. Born in 1921 in a pleasant Parisian suburb, Christian-François Bouche-Villeneuve racked up many pseudonyms and monikers: Sandor Krasna, Jacopo Berenzi, Fritz Markassin. Early on, as if in anticipation of the new vocabularies and identities that would proliferate in the digital era, he signed himself Chris.Marker.

… Across many fields – in graphic design, multimedia, but most of all in film – he made the activity of thinking about images, whether photographic or moving, seem both profound and playful… [read more]

——
more at chrismarker.org

Female in Gaza by Monique Jacques

Female in Gaza – NYTimes.com.
Powerful photo essay in the April 20 Sunday Review by Photography & Imaging alumnus Monique Jacques 

I have been photographing in Gaza for several years, initially to cover the conflict with Israel, but over time returning because I am mesmerized by the women, and their strength. [read more and view slideshow]

Monique Jaques is a photojournalist based in Istanbul. She has spent the past three years focused on documenting issues in the Middle East as well as Afghanistan and India. After graduating from New York University’s Photography and Imaging program she traveled extensively through the region and landed in Turkey.  See her website for many more incredible projects.