Tag Archives: feminism

Doris Salcedo inspiration

One of my art heroes who continues to inspire me…

“The act of sewing together each piece of cloth in an act of reparation, of knitting our own peace and is especially important at this time of uncertainty,” -Doris Salcedo

Participants in an artistic intervention by Doris Salcedo at the Plaza de Bolívar in Bogotá, Colombia, Oct 11, 2016 Photo: Leonardo Muñoz/EPA

Participants in an artistic intervention by Doris Salcedo at the Plaza de Bolívar in Bogotá, Colombia, Oct 11, 2016 Photo: Leonardo Muñoz/EPA

DORIS SALCEDO, has covered Bogotá’s central plaza in a massive white shroud.

In an act of protest against a civil conflict that has raged for more than 50 years, the plaza was covered in a massive white shroud bearing the names of the war’s many victims.

The public statement of mourning by artist Doris Salcedo was temporarily installed as the country grapples with the rejection of a peace deal with leftist Farc rebels that would have ended the war. [read more]

More on the intervention in an article on Hyperallergic

Watch this video for more on/by Doris Salcedo >>

And even more on this great artist on Art 21

And her Guggenheim exhibition is a great resource.

Cindy Sherman: ‘Why am I in these photos?’

Cindy Sherman: ‘Why am I in these photos?’| The Guardian

Photographer Cindy Sherman talks about a difficult childhood, her compulsion to dress up, growing older – and why she now prefers to live alone.

…”A flick through the photographs in her current retrospective exhibition in LA reveals her transformed into 20 kinds of matinee starlet, Hitchcock lead, pneumatic Monroe, terrified centrefold, crime-scene corpse, old master muse, cut-up sex doll, Republican wife, clown; both as determinedly absent and iconically present in her work as Andy Warhol once was in his.” [read entire article]

Cindy Sherman in front of her work at the Broad museum, Los Angeles, where a major retrospective of her work is taking place. Photograph: Dan Tuffs for the Observer

Faith Ringgold Looks Back on Her Life in Art, Activism, and Education

Faith Ringgold photographed in New Jersey on Nov 23, 2015. KATHERINE MCMAHON

“[I realized] I can’t tell your story, I can only tell mine. I can’t be you, I can only be me,”

An important and inspiring read with need to know history > The Storyteller: At 85, Her Star Still Rising, Faith Ringgold Looks Back on Her Life in Art, Activism, and Education

Faith Ringgold, The American People Series #20: Die, 1967.

Ringgold’s original plan had been to study art. But when she showed up at City College’s School of Liberal Arts, she was informed that it did not admit women. “They’re sitting there trying to make me understand that I cannot get a liberal arts degree there,” she said, “and I am refusing to understand. And out of it, one woman says”—Ringgold dropped her voice to a whisper—“ ‘She can do it. Let me tell you how. She can [enroll in the School of Education] and major in art.’ ”

Faith Ringgold, Tar Beach, 1988.

www.faithringgold.com

Source: The Storyteller: At 85, Her Star Still Rising, Faith Ringgold Looks Back on Her Life in Art, Activism, and Education | ARTnews

 

 

Nao Bustamante’s Soldaderas, Real and Imagined

New Project from one of my favorite artists Nao Bustamente – women, history, identity, revolution, subversion, re-enactement, and archival research!

Nao Bustamante’s “Soldadera” is a “speculative reenactment” of women’s participation in The Mexican Revolution. ­­
>> Article from KCET
>> Article in LA Times

Source: Nao Bustamante’s Soldaderas, Real and Imagined | Los Angeles | Artbound | KCET

Lyndsey Addario

It’s what I do – new memoir by Photojournalist Lynsey Addario

Article in New York Times Sunday Book Review

Excerpt in NY Times magazine: “What Can a Pregnant Photojournalist Cover? Everything.”

Article and video at TIME light Box

“I would never think of myself as a role model,” says Lynsey Addario. The 41-year-old, twice-kidnapped, mother-of-one, award-winning photojournalist has released, this month, her first book: an autobiography of her life as a Connecticut-born photographer who has spent the last 15 years witnessing the true human cost of war, particularly for women across the world. [read more of the TIME piece and watch video]

The hook for the TIME article is  “Meet the Photographer Who Found How to Balance a Life of Love and War ” –  Although this inspired from the tag line of her memoir (exact wording: “A Photographer’s Life of Love and War” – would the focus on ‘Balance’ ever been used to describe a male photojournalist? Lyndsey Addario has published many brilliant statements on the gender bias in war journalism. (see this post in The NY Times Lens Blog.) Many more entries about her on the Lens blog as well.

Another good interview can be found on the Word and Film website: One Woman’s Wars: A Q&A with Photojournalist Lynsey Addario.

Needless to say, I will be buying and reading the book.

 

Female in Gaza by Monique Jacques

Female in Gaza – NYTimes.com.
Powerful photo essay in the April 20 Sunday Review by Photography & Imaging alumnus Monique Jacques 

I have been photographing in Gaza for several years, initially to cover the conflict with Israel, but over time returning because I am mesmerized by the women, and their strength. [read more and view slideshow]

Monique Jaques is a photojournalist based in Istanbul. She has spent the past three years focused on documenting issues in the Middle East as well as Afghanistan and India. After graduating from New York University’s Photography and Imaging program she traveled extensively through the region and landed in Turkey.  See her website for many more incredible projects.

 

Nan Goldin’s Ballad of Sexual Dependency

Songs Left Out of Nan Goldin’s Ballad of Sexual Dependency
Aperture Foundation NY

Nan Goldin’s Ballad of Sexual Dependency started as a slide show with music.  To mark the third printing of Nan Goldin’s Ballad of Sexual Dependency Aperture has put online a piece by Greil Marcus on the soundtrack to Goldin’s original slideshow presentation of the work. Originally printed in Aperture #197 Winter 2009.

They have also assembled a YouTube playlist based on the soundtrack for Goldin’s slideshow, listen here.

Also, see interview and article @ Top Photography FIlms

Nan Goldin – Matthew Marks Gallery

Wangechi Mutu by Deborah Willis

BOMB Magazine — Wangechi Mutu by Deborah Willis.BOMB Magazine — Wangechi Mutu by Deborah Willis

From the introduction by Deborah Willis to her interview with Wangechi Muti at her studio:

Wangechi Mutu was born in Nairobi, Kenya, in 1972.  Mutu’s work explores the interplay between “the real” and fiction, combining ideas found in literature, history, and fables to examine female identity and women’s roles throughout history. She has made sketches and created collages and video about the female body since her days at Cooper Union. In my view, allegory is central to her work and is made apparent through the use of collage, and fragmented or constructed imagery. The complexity of her layering of objects, mark-making, and collage  is achieved through her use of translucent materials, photography, and drawing. She also works with performance, a central component of her video installations. For some 15 years now, I have had the distinct pleasure of seeing Mutu pose for the camera for other artists. As I’ve followed Mutu over the years, I have had opportunities to see her work in museums here in New York City, in Toronto, and in galleries in cites both large and small. I love watching people engage and question as they view her work. My own writing and artwork also focuses on the black female body, and I am intrigued by the way Mutu manages to successfully focus her vision on sexuality, desire, and colonialism—while also incorporating girl culture, as well as popular and art historical references. She keeps her viewers engaged as she delves into and visually illuminates universal stories about ritual and myth. In this oral history, I hope to introduce new readings of how her work is viewed, consumed, collected, appreciated, and critiqued. [read interview]

Wangechi Muti website

LaToya Ruby Frazier


Born by a River,
Watching the Change.

Great piece on LaToya Ruby Frazier in the NY Times Lens Blog about her ongoing work in her hometown of Braddock, Pennsylvania.

 

The project’s title was inspired by Sam Cooke’s “A Change Is Gonna Come,” an epochal civil-rights-era song in which the protagonist, “born by the river” in a time of rampant segregation and racism, imagines a better and more just world. Glimmers of optimism and self-possession shine through the gloom of Ms. Frazier’s pictures — from the splendor of her deceased grandmother’s doll collection to the determination on her young cousin’s face — rescuing her subjects from the visual stereotypes of black poverty.

Another great article on the project in Art Voices

Visit LaToya Ruby Frazier’s website to see more of her work.

This Tumblr User Shows Her Horrific Anonymous Messages In A Powerful Art Project

This Tumblr User Shows Her Horrific Anonymous Messages In A Powerful Art Project.

Bottos, a photography major and gender studies minor, runs a Tumblr page where she often uploads selfies as well as pictures of her work.

Since starting the Tumblr in 2010, she has received hundreds of cruel anonymous messages. Last week, she turned the words of hate into a feminist art project; Bottos screencapped some of the messages and posted them over pictures of herself. [link to project]