Tag Archives: copyright

Exposing the Invisible

 
Exposing the invisible > A  series of case studies, interviews and tools that explore the far reaches of metadata in its capacity to protect, investigate and expose abuses of power.

EXCERPT: Interesting interview and important essay on metadata  Harlo Holmes: Metadata or it Didn’t Happen | Exposing the Invisible (much more on the site)

How would you describe metadata?
Metadata is data about data. Primarily it’s the site that portrays the actual, what one would call the “Ur event”, i.e. how a particular digital property came into existence. So going back to your previous question of why I find it so interesting, it all goes back to Walter Benjamin’s idea of the replicability of art, how art in the modern age loses some of its luster because it’s so immediately accessible and is infinitely replicable. But metadata, I find, is a site that actually preserves that uniqueness even though things might be on their surface copied and filmed all over the place continuously, metadata is that site of originality.

What is CameraV?
CameraV begun its life as a mobile app named InformaCam created by The Guardian Project and WITNESS. It’s a way of adding a whole lot of extra metadata to a photograph or video in order to verify its authenticity. It’s a piece of software that does two things. Firstly it describes the who, what, when, where, why and how of images and video and secondly it establishes a chain of custody that could be pointed to in a court of law. The app captures a lot of metadata at the time of the image is shot including not only geo-location information (which has always been standard), but corroborating data such as visible wifi networks, cell tower IDs and bluetooth signals from others in the area. It has additional information such as light meter values, that can go towards corroborating a story where you might want to tell what time of the day it is. [read more]

 

Fair Use & Image Integrity & Self-Defense

3 great online resources.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation: (EFF) Surveillance Self Defense Guide

The Integrity of the Image report from World Press Photo: Current practices and accepted standards internationally, when it comes to the manipulation of still images in photojournalism.

Storify piece by David Campbell on responses to the rejection of 20% of the entries  for World Press Photo Competition for the over manipulation of the image: What are World Press Photo’s rules and standards on manipulation?

College Art Association (CAA) has published Copyright, Permissions and Fair Use among Visual Artists and the Academic and Museum Visual Arts Communities: An Issues Report

Link to the sites for more information and FREE downloads. Thank you to all 3 organizations for this service to the field.

The Real Story About the Wrong Photos in #BringBackOurGirls

NY TIMES LENS BLOG, May 8, 2014
The Real Story About the Wrong Photos in #BringBackOurGirls.

A Twitter campaign using the hashtag #BringBackOurGirls has focused global attention on the plight of some 276 Nigerian schoolgirls kidnapped by the Islamic militant group Boko Haram. Three photos of girls have been posted and reposted thousands of times, including by the BBC and by the singer Chris Brown (who himself has had issues with anger management and violence against women).

One problem: The photos are of girls from Guinea-Bissau, more than 1,000 miles from Nigeria, who have no relationship to the kidnappings.

The use of these pictures raises troubling questions of representation, and misrepresentation. Ami Vitale, the photographer who made the original images as part of a long-term project, spoke with James Estrin on Thursday. [read more]

British Library Releases 1M Images into the Public Domain

British Library Releases 1M Images into the Public Domain

from British Library Science Fiction SetEarlier this month, Open Culture pointed to a big move from the British Library: the library is putting a million images into the public domain. Accessible on the library’s sprawling Flickr account, these images’s copyright statuses are marked as “ < a href=”http://www.flickr.com/commons/usage/”>no known copyright restrictions.”

…A quick glance at Flickr’s Commons listingsshows that the British Library joins other institutions like the Vancouver Public Library Historical Photographs, Mississippi Department of Archives and History, the Brooklyn Museum, the Library of Congress, and many more in offering their holdings to the public this way. [read entire article]

Daniel Morel

I grew up in this neighborhood everybody knew me, you know. They didn’t even see me. I just keep on working… I was not trying to get something special  …I was not looking for good photos, I was just shooting. >>>

Daniel Morel speaking about photographing in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake in a video of his photographs  on TIME magazine website. I highly recommending watching. LINK TO VIDEO

Following is a collection of the some of the many articles written about the important Daniel Morel copyright case against Agence France Presse and Getty Images.

©Daniel Morel One of the eight images by Daniel Morel of the aftermath of the January 12, 2010 Haiti earthquake that was distributed by AFP and Getty Images. – See more at: PDN online

Morel v. AFP Copyright Verdict: Defense Strategy to Devalue Photos and Vilify Photographer Backfires
November 26, 2013 by David Walker, PDN

Photographer Daniel Morel says his decisive victory in court last week against Agence France Presse (AFP) and Getty images was not only vindication for him, but a victory for all photographers trying to eke out a living in the digital age.

A federal jury awarded Morel $1.2 million in damages after determining that both agencies willfully infringed his copyrights in 2010 by distributing eight of his exclusive news images of the Haiti earthquake without permission.

“I hope the internet is going to be a little safer now for all artists, all photographers,” he told PDN the day after the jury reached its verdict. more >>

————- MORE ————–

New York Times Lens Blog article by James Estrin

Peta Pixel by DL Cade

Link to several articles at the British Journal of Photography

Editorial Photographers of UK and Ireland

Daniel Morel vs. Agence France Presse and Getty Images Facebook Page

Daniel Morel website 

Who Really Owns Your Photos in Social Media?

Who Really Owns Your Photos in Social Media?
Mediashift | PBS

.A recent U.S. court decision clarified that media organizations cannot assume that photos shared via Twitter are rights-free, to be used as though they were in the public domain.

In the case of Agence France-Presse (AFP) v. Morel, U.S. District Judge Alison Nathan ruled in favor of freelance photographer Daniel Morel. Her judgment: Both AFP and the Washington Post had infringed on Morel’s copyright. READ MORE

Law and Technology

New links I have come across:

Legal Ethics and Social Media
site contains both resources for legal information and curated links interesting articles from a wide variety of sites.

The Instagram Papers
from ASMP (American Society of Media Photographers)

Copyright Crash Course from Univ of Texas

The Copyright Corner – resources for artists and designers
Developed and maintained by photographer and lawyer Michelle Bogre

A Conversation with Jonathan Lethem

From Rhizome: A Conversation with Jonathan Lethem.

In 2007, novelist Jonathan Lethem published an essay in Harpers ending with a grand reveal: “every line I  stole, warped, and cobbled together.” The patchwork includes dozens of sources — part of a Steve Erickson novel, something from a Pitchfork review, a quote from an interview with Rick Prelinger. Sandra Day OConnor and Ralph Waldo Emerson are stitched in too.  The Ecstasy of Influence, now the title of his recent collection of writings, often addresses the process of integrating and “cobbling together” ideas and culture to make something new. Yet, stories Lethem relates of hosting “mailing parties” for the Philip K Dick Society or working in a bookstore seem like snapshots from pre-digital age. Recently I talked with the author about our rapidly dematerializing culture as well as appropriation as an art practice: read interview